Volunteers Needed for SFoB Booth

Jack Belair working hard at the 2017 Booth

Come volunteer at the WNBA booth during the Southern Festival of Books! Our goals are:

  1. to share our love for WNBA with passersby and recruite new members
  2. to raise money for scholarships to the Young Writers’ Workshops hosted by Humanities Tennessee by selling assorted bookish merchandise.

Everyone is welcome to join us and a good time will be had by all!

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

For more information and to sign up for a shift please visit: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050d4eafaf28abff2-wnba

 

Coffee with Authors 2019 – Reserved Seating Full!

 

One of our favorite events of the year, the Southern Festival of Books, is coming soon, and it’s time to reserve your spot at one of our favorite events at the festival.

Coffee with Authors

Saturday, October 12, 9:30 – 11:00 a.m.
(check-in and coffee from 9 – 9:30)

Nashville Public Library Auditorium

615 Church Street

Nashville, TN 37219


Library doors opens at 9:00 a.m.

This year’s panel will be moderated by Mary Laura Philpott and feature authors:

Anissa Gray, The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls

Taylor Jenkins Reid, Daisy Jones and the Six: A Novels

Karen Thompson Walker, The Dreamers

Alexi Zentner, Copperhead: A Novel

Reserved seating in the auditorium is completely full.  There will be an opportunity for walk-ins (for viewing only) in the library’s Teen Center (via large screen). 

Coffee With Authors is presented by the Women’s National Book Association, celebrating 100 years of Connecting, Educating, Advocating and Leading since 1917!

For more information about the Southern Festival of Books, go to: http://humanitiestennessee.org/programs/southern-festival-books-celebration-written-word

Meetings Resume September 5th

Please join us Thursday, September 5 at our new location,  Dalt’s American Grill on White Bridge Road for our annual presentation of authors to check out at the Southern Festival of Books. Gail Vinett and Nicole Robinson-Hamilton will discuss programs and authors you won’t want to miss. We have pushed our start time back a bit to accommodate “the new Nashville” and will start the program at 6:30 and is free and open to the public. Arrive early to network with members and guests, starting at 5:30. Meals and beverages are available for purchase if desired. 

A MESSAGE FROM BETH

Hello WNBA Nashville,

A new year for WNBA has begun and we are looking forward to another year of excellent programs starting September 5th with Gail Vinett and Nicole Robinson-Hamilton giving us a preview of the highlights of the Southern Festival of Books, Yes, it’s right around the corner.

Please take a moment and renew your membership. The membership year runs June 1 to May 31 and the cost is $40.

If you have any questions, contact Nancy Dickinson.

Also, we are working on updating our Meet our Members section of the website. Submit a short paragraph (100 words or less) about yourself, and if you have a photo or website link to include, please do so. Send it to our webmaster: Jackie Belair.

Hope everyone is having a lovely summer! Looking forward to seeing you soon,

Beth

Find us online!
Facebook: WNBANashville
Instagram: wnbanashville

April Program – New Location!!!!

What Would Mrs. Astor Do?  – Cecelia Tichi

6:00 – 7:00 p.m., at Dalt’s American Grill On White Bridge on March 4, 2019

Courtesy of Jamie Adams

Cecelia Tichi is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English and Professor of American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She received her M.A. from Johns Hopkins University and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in 1968. Before coming to Vanderbilt in 1987, she taught at Boston University. At Vanderbilt, she teaches classes in nineteenth and twentieth century American literature, focusing on aspects of culture from consumerism and social critique to country music. She has received fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Radcliffe Institute, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Kluge Center of the Library of Congress, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation under the auspices of the Henry E. Huntington Library. She is the 2009 recipient of the Jay B. Hubbell prize for distinguished work in American literary studies. awarded by the American Literature Division of the Modern Language Association.

Her latest book project, What Would Mrs. Astor Do? The Essential Guide to the Manners and Mores of the Gilded Age (New York University Press, 2018), discusses the many rules for making it to the top tier of high society during the late 19th century .


From New York University Press:

A richly illustrated romp with America’s Gilded Age leisure class—and those angling to join it  Mark Twain called it the Gilded Age. Between 1870 and 1900, the United States’ population doubled, accompanied by an unparalleled industrial expansion, and an explosion of wealth unlike any the world had ever seen. America was the foremost nation of the world, and New York City was its beating heart. There, the richest and most influential—Thomas Edison, J. P. Morgan, Edith Wharton, the Vanderbilts, Andrew Carnegie, and more—became icons, whose comings and goings were breathlessly reported in the papers of Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. It was a time of abundance, but also bitter rivalries, in work and play. The Old Money titans found themselves besieged by a vanguard of New Money interlopers eager to gain entrée into their world of formal balls, debutante parties, opera boxes, sailing regattas, and summer gatherings at Newport. Into this morass of money and desire stepped Caroline Astor. 

 Mrs. Astor, an Old Money heiress of the first order, became convinced that she was uniquely qualified to uphold the manners and mores of Gilded Age America. Wherever she went, Mrs. Astor made her judgments, dictating proper behavior and demeanor, men’s and women’s codes of dress, acceptable patterns of speech and movements of the body, and what and when to eat and drink. The ladies and gentlemen of high society took note. “What would Mrs. Astor do?” became the question every social climber sought to answer. And an invitation to her annual ball was a golden ticket into the ranks of New York’s upper crust. This work serves as a guide to manners as well as an insight to Mrs. Astor’s personal diary and address book, showing everything from the perfect table setting to the array of outfits the elite wore at the time. Channeling the queen of the Gilded Age herself, Cecelia Tichi paints a portrait of New York’s social elite, from the schools to which they sent their children, to their lavish mansions and even their reactions to the political and personal scandals of the day.  

 Ceceilia Tichi invites us on a beautifully illustrated tour of the Gilded Age, transporting readers to New York at its most fashionable. A colorful tapestry of fun facts and true tales, What Would Mrs. Astor Do? presents a vivid portrait of this remarkable time of social metamorphosis, starring Caroline Astor, the ultimate gatekeeper.

Tichi is the author of nine scholarly books, most recently What Would Mrs. Astor Do: A Complete Guide to the Manner and Mores of the Gilded Age and Jack London: A Writer’s Fight for a Better America, as well as the editor of several others, including Reading Country Music: Steel Guitars, Opry Stars, and Honky-Tonk Bars (1998). Her books include Shifting Gears: Technology, Literature, Culture in Modernist America (1987) and Electronic Hearth: Creating an American Television Culture (1991),Exposes and Excess Muckraking in America 1900/2000. Her most recent book, Civic Passions: 7 Who Launched Progressive America (And What They Teach Us), was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2009. Her articles on a variety of topics and authors have appeared in journals such as American Literature, American Literary History, and The Boston Review. She is also the author of five novels: Jealous Heart (1997), Cryin’ Time (1998), Fall to Pieces (2000), Now You See Her (2005), and All in One Piece (2006).

Jonathan’s has closed so this month we’ll meet at Dalt’s American Grill on White Bridge Road at 5:30 for socializing and dinner, and the program will start at 6:00 on Thursday, April 4th.

March Program

History Through Poetry  – Ciona Rouse

6:00 – 7:00 p.m., at Jonathan’s Grille in Green Hills on March 7, 2019

Ciona Rouse is a poet and author of Vantablack ( Third Man Books, 2017). Rouse is poetry editor of the online literary journal Wordpeace and cohost of the upcoming Re/Verb podcast from Third Man Books. Her work can be found in Native Magazine, Gabby Journal,Matter: a journal of political poetry and commentary and Talking River. In addition to curating many poetry experiences and workshops in Nashville, she also collaborates with various artists to create multi-disciplinary performances, including the show The Longest Night with saxophonist Jeff Coffin and composer Jason Shelton at Oz Arts, A Delta Blue Christmas with blues musician and poet Adia Victoria and poet Caroline Randall Williams and Nick Cave: Feat, a performance at the Schermmerhorn in 2018 with the visual artist Nick Cave for the Frist Art Museum, which was recognized as the year’s best poetry performance in the Nashville Scene.

Just as a reminder, we’ll meet at Jonathan’s in Green Hills at 5:30 for socializing and dinner, and the program will start at 6:00 on Thursday, March 7th.

Young Adult Fiction: It’s Not Just for the Young

Last year’s Mystery Panel at the Green Hills Library was a huge success and we just know that this year’s topic Young Adult Fiction will be just as amazing. Join us Saturday, February 23, 2019 to learn why young adult fiction is not just for the young from award winning YA authors Tracy Barrett and Sharon Cameron.

Tracy Barrett has written more than twenty books for children and young adults. A grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to study medieval women writers led to the writing of her first novel, the award-winning Anna of Byzantium (Delacorte). Her most recent publications are a contemporary YA novel, Freefall Summer, which draws on her own skydiving adventures; a middle-grade fantasy entitled Marabel and the Book of Fate; The Song of Orpheus: The Greatest Greek Myths You Never Heard, a collection of little-known Greek myths; and the popular middle-grade series The Sherlock Files.

Sharon Cameron was born and raised in Nashville. She has been a classical piano teacher, a full-time mom, a part-time genealogist, chair of a non-profit for local theater group and a coordinator of the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Midsouth Conference. Her most recent book, The Forgetting hit #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list for ebooks. Her other works include Rook, A Spark Unseen, and The Dark Unwinding.


This event is FREE; sponsored by the Nashville Public Library & the Women’s National Book Association-Nashville Chapter.

Nashville Public Library Green Hills
3701 Benham Ave, Nashville, TN 37215
Saturday, February 23, 2019, 10:30-12

WNBA Nashville Donates 125 Books to Book’em

We are so happy to say that we collected 125 books for Book’em at our November program. Book’em is such an amazing organization that is helping to ignite children’s passion for reading through book ownership. They envision a future in Nashville where all children own books and know first-hand the joy and value of reading. We are happy to work with them and greatly appreciate the generosity of all of our members.

February Meeting – Feb 7

We are excited about our February program with Brenda Vantrease. Brenda’s second book in her new series Broken Kingdom will be released February 1, 2019, just in time for our program.

Brenda’s historical fiction has been critically acclaimed, translated in more than a dozen languages and is widely distributed in libraries worldwide. The religious and political intrigue in the history of England from the 14th through the 17th century, is where she finds the drama, conflict, and characters that ignite her imagination and shape her stories. The Broken Kingdom Series is set in the British civil war.

Broken Kingdom, a series centered on conflicts between Charles I of England and his Parliament.

A Far Horizon is listed on the Parnassus website here and you can use this link to order or call the store at 615-953-2243 and place an order by phone.

For more information on her novels, go to: http://www.brendarickmanvantrease.

Just as a reminder, we’ll meet at Jonathan’s in Green Hills at 5:30 for socializing and dinner, and the program will start at 6:00 on Thursday, February 7th.

Holiday Dinner – December 13

Our annual Holiday Dinner for members and their guests is Thursday, December 13, at The Women’s Club of Nashville. The dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. Our speaker, Tamera Alexander, is known for her series of historical novels set at Belle Meade Plantation and at Belmont Mansion and is working on a series set at Carnton Plantation. Perhaps a series set in the Daniel house may someday be forthcoming! https://tameraalexander.com

The Women’s Club of Nashville is located at 3206 Hillsboro Road. The property may be entered from Golf Club Lane or from Hillsboro Pike.  Parking is ample. 

Advance registration is required. The cost is $45 per person, which includes gratuity and a $5 donation to help fund a scholarship for the Tennessee Young Writers Workshop. Payment can be made by either check or online. Visit our Holiday Dinner Page for reservation and menu information.